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Philip Kuchar

Philip Kuchar

God, Atheism and Incompatibility: The Argument from Nonbelief (2001)

Kuchar defends an Argument from Nonbelief against God's existence (ANB) similar to that argued by J. L. Schellenberg, which differs in some respects from that argued by Theodore Drange. In short, the mere existence of nonbelievers or the presence of sufficient evidence for nonbelief in God's existence is incompatible with God given a certain description of him.

A Rebuttal to Pardi's Criticism of ANB (2004)

"I argue that Pardi's criticisms of Drange's version of the argument from nonbelief (ANB) do not refute ANB, although they may or may not require peripheral corrections or clarifications on Drange's part. I focus not so much on Drange's formulation, but on what I take to be the central intuitions of ANB and on the inadequacy of Pardi's objections. I assume some familiarity with Pardi's paper and with ANB, although I present what I consider to be ANB's central claims."

Featured Editorials:

Double-Talk in Defense of the Dubious (2000)

Here are two questionable propositions the theologian repeatedly offers. (1) God respects our free will so much that he allows non-believers to do their own thing for eternity in hell. (2) God loved us so much that he forgave our sins by punishing Jesus instead of sinners. Both propositions have the same problem: the language used refutes itself.

The Incoherence of Original Sin and Substitutive Sacrifice (2000)

Christianity is based on the unusual idea of sacrificial punishment. The atonement has been interpreted in different ways, but the explanation stemming from some of the more vocal apologists is that of substitution. Curious concepts are employed to make sense of the central idea. When examined, these explanations turn out to be incoherent, a fact which casts doubt on the truth of Christianity's central concept, that Jesus' death was a sacrifice.


Philip Kuchar received his B.A. in Philosophy from York University in Toronto and an M.A. in philosophy from Queen's University in Kingston. He is currently working on a Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Western Ontario. See his other articles listed in the Secular Web Library.


Published on the Secular Web


Modern Library

A Rebuttal to Pardi’s Criticism of ANB

I argue that Pardi’s criticisms of Drange’s version of the argument from nonbelief (ANB) do not refute ANB, although they may or may not require peripheral corrections or clarifications on Drange’s part. I focus not so much on Drange’s formulation, but on what I take to be the central intuitions of ANB and on the inadequacy of Pardi’s objections. I assume some familiarity with Pardi’s paper and with ANB, although I present what I consider to be ANB’s central claims.
Kiosk Article

Double-Talk in Defense of the Dubious

The existence of both hell and God's love and mercy cannot easily be justified, and neither can the appropriateness of substitutive sacrifice. In wanting to hide or soften the repugnant ideas of hell and human sacrifice, the theologian resorts to "double-talk".

The Incoherence of Original Sin and Substitutive Sacrifice

The punishment suffered by Jesus, that of the crucifixion, gave rise to multiple interpretations to explain how and why God allowed His Son to suffer so. The concept of Original Sin became one of the central tenets of the Christian religion to explain God's actions in sacrificing His Son. Jesus is said to have born the sins of the world in an effort to cleanse humanity from sin. The author explores the concept of Original Sin, the idea of sin transferal, while questioning the notion of whether Jesus' fate was indeed a sacrifice as claimed.