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Biblical Criticism

Apocryphal Apparitions: 1 Corinthians 15:3-11 As a Post-Pauline Interpolation (1995) by Robert Price

The Death of Judas (n.d.) (Off Site) by Steven Elliott

This page brings together in one place most or all of the problems concerning the biblical account of the death of Judas.

Elucidation of Genesis 1 (n.d.) (Off Site) by Shlomi Tal

This article is a secular-minded elucidation of the first chapter of the book of Genesis based on the original Hebrew text, with translation and commentary.

The Institution Narrative of Luke 22:19-20 (1995?) by James Still

An advanced analysis of the Institution Narrative in Luke. Did Paul receive the Eucharist from James and the disciples in Jerusalem? Or did he look to a pagan world replete with savior-sacrifice rituals for his motif? The author suggests that there is a third option.

Biblical Problems (1992-2011) by Donald Morgan [ Index]

Introduction to the Bible and Bible Problems

Key to Abbreviations

Fatal Bible Flaws?

Bible Absurdities

Bible Atrocities

Bible Inconsistencies: Bible Contradictions?

Bible Precepts: Questionable Guidelines

Bible Vulgarities

A List of Biblical Contradictions by (1992) Jim Meritt

The Little Known Literary Battles Between the Gospel Writers (1999) by James Deardorff

The most obvious solution to the Synoptic Problem (order of priority among the New Testament Gospels) has been rejected by most scholars since the 19th century largely because of embarrassments it was causing for the church and/or their own theologies. However, if theological commitment is abandoned and the evangelists are considered to have been human beings with human emotions, rather than pipelines from God, it is seen that numerous editorial oddities associated with the traditionally attested order (Matthew-Mark-Luke) are easily explainable and make good psychological sense. They indicate that the gospel writers were engaged in a behind-the-scenes tit-for-tat battle brought on by the strong anti-gentile slant of the Gospel of Matthew in its Hebraic form.

Old Testament Life and Literature (1968) [ index ] by Gerald A. Larue

The Problem of the Virgin Birth Prophecy (2003) by Richard Carrier

Carrier summarizes the debate over whether Isaiah in 7:14 meant 'virgin' in what is taken by Christians to be a prophecy of the messiah's birth. He concludes that whatever the case Isaiah probably did not mean a virgin would conceive in any supernatural sense.

Prophecies: Imaginary and Unfulfilled (1991)

If bibliolaters would just once in their lives put aside all of their pet theories and take an objective look at the Bible, they would begin to see that the men who wrote the Old Testament were just ordinary religious zealots who thought that they and their people had been specifically chosen of God. The fanaticism with which they believed this led them to proclaim absurdly ethnocentric prophecies that history has proven wrong, much to the embarrassment of Bible fundamentalists who desperately want to believe that the Bible is the verbally inspired, inerrant word of God. They have no substantive proof on their side. All the proof declares very definitively to anyone who really wants to know the truth that the Bible is a veritable maze of nonsense and contradictions.

Revelation's Place in the Christian Bible (2007) by Keith Gilmour

Christianity has elevated John's Revelation into a "sacred text" by including it in the New Testament canon. This has afforded divine legitimation to the cruelties contained within it, frequently cultivating a callous indifference towards (and often an outright enthusiasm for) the sufferings of "out-group" members everywhere whilst lumbering us with a tyrannical warrior god--a powerful "record keeper" desirous of unceasing worship.

Review of Paul (2006) by Jacob Aliet

Well written in an artistic but critical style, Günther Bornkamm's Paul attempts to outline Paul's life and work before finally turning to his theology and gospel. While drawing on the work of several New Testament scholars, Bornkamm largely relies on his own interpretation of the Pauline epistles, Acts, and the interplay between them, leaving the reader to evaluate his arguments primarily on their own merits. Against source-critical methods, Bornkamm occasionally uses the texts he has judged as inauthentic as reliable sources of information without recourse to any clear criteria, and dismisses uncomfortable passages attributed to Paul as inauthentic without offering any supportive arguments. This ad hoc pick-and-choose methodology leaves his presumptions open to criticism where the texts are silent or in conflict. But otherwise Paul is a great book, generally utilizing critical evaluation of the sources to unravel Paul's ingenious and enigmatic character.

Review of Spong's Liberating the Gospels (1997) (Off Site) by Earl Doherty

The Syrophoenician Woman in Mark 7:25-30/Matthew 15:21-28 (1995?) by James Still

The author discusses the famous story of the pagan woman whose clever retort against Jesus wins the day.

The Sinai Argument (2001) by Shlomi Tal

As do fundamentalist Christians with the empty tomb, Orthodox Jews base their faith on the alleged historical fact of the revelation at Mount Sinai, and some sects of Christianity ultimately presume the historicity of that event as well. This essay rebuts one argument for the historicity of a public revelation put forward by Rabbi Yehuda Halevi and Rabbi Dr. Dovid Gottlieb.

What is a Gospel? (1995?) by James Still

Why I Am Not a Christian (2000) by Keith Parsons

In this explanation of why he is not a Christian, Keith Parsons discusses the role that Christianity has played in perpetuating suffering throughout human history, the bizarre doctrine of inflicting eternal punishment on persons for having the wrong beliefs, the composition, inconsistencies, and absurdities of the New Testament Gospels, William Lane Craig's flawed case for the resurrection of Jesus, the role of legendary development and hallucinations in early Christianity, and C.S. Lewis' weak justifications for the Christian prohibition on premarital sex.

The Word of the LORD (2002) by Tony Kuphaldt

This is a compilation of biblical quotes which drove Kuphaldt away from belief in the Bible as the "Word of God." Included are examples of biblical racism, wishful thinking, subjugation of women, contradictions, failed prophecies and other biblical problems. In the end, Kuphaldt concludes that "God" was only an imaginary friend.


See also: Biblical Errancy. Browse the Bookstore for books on biblical criticism and biblical errancy.

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